Fund Teachers for the Dream Grant Proposal and Application

Fund Teachers for the Dream Grant Proposal and Application

The Fund Teachers for the Dream grant was again awarded to the Pennsylvania Council of Teachers of English and Language Arts (PCTELA) by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)! Just like last year, we are using this grant in order to mentor pre-service teaching candidates and new teachers within their first three years of teaching.

Our goal is to select teachers of color who are enthusiastic, academically ­driven, and passionate about this profession! We want to support these teachers in developing and implementing a mentoring opportunity for students so they can grow professionally and share that flare for learning with students across Pennsylvania.

We will be selecting two pre-service teaching candidates and/or new teachers within their first three years of teaching from Pennsylvania to mentor as they develop and enact an activity for students in a “pay it forward” play on professional development.

The teaching candidates and/or new teachers selected for this opportunity will receive:

  • Up to $100 to purchase materials for your proposed activity with students
  • Complimentary registration fee to attend the NCTE Affiliate Leadership Meeting in July 2018
  • Complimentary one ­day registration to the Annual PCTELA Conference in Pittsburgh, PA on October 19-20, 2018
  • Complimentary attendance at our PCTELA Board Dinner on October 19, 2018

See the full details and timeline for more information!

If you’re interested in applying for this fantastic opportunity, please don’t delay! Applications are due by Friday October 20, 2017.

You do not need to be an English or Reading teacher to submit a proposal! We welcome all teachers with a heart for using literacy in the classroom (reading, writing, speaking, and listening standards) at any grade level!

APPLY HERE

 

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Fund Teachers for the Dream Grant Proposal and Application

A Poem to Pair with The Awakening

Today my classes finished reading Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, and I started class by sharing the poem “Sympathy” by Paul Laurence Dunbar. Your students might recognize this poem as the source of the title line for Maya Angelou’s book I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

We only talked about the poem for a few minutes, but it led us in to our discussion of Edna and whether or not she could ever be free in her society/time period/marriage.

Sympathy

Paul Laurence Dunbar

I know what the caged bird feels, alas!

When the sun is bright on the upland slopes;   

When the wind stirs soft through the springing grass,   

And the river flows like a stream of glass;

When the first bird sings and the first bud opes,   

And the faint perfume from its chalice steals—

I know what the caged bird feels!

 

I know why the caged bird beats his wing

Till its blood is red on the cruel bars;   

For he must fly back to his perch and cling   

When he fain would be on the bough a-swing;

And a pain still throbs in the old, old scars   

And they pulse again with a keener sting—

I know why he beats his wing!

 

I know why the caged bird sings, ah me,

When his wing is bruised and his bosom sore,—

When he beats his bars and he would be free;

It is not a carol of joy or glee,

But a prayer that he sends from his heart’s deep core,   

But a plea, that upward to Heaven he flings—

I know why the caged bird sings!

A Poem to Pair with The Awakening

A Poem for Today: Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 by William Wordsworth

Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802
William Wordsworth

Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty;
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!

A Poem for Today: Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 by William Wordsworth

Book Review: Reading Libba Bray’s Beauty Queens

With the recent announcement of two men who thought it might be a good idea to try a Lord of the Flies with all women, book twitter blew up (and not in a good way. c’mon, guys, just use the google). In case everyone forgot, Libba Bray had already done this in 2011 with Beauty Queens (and to be fair, Anabel McDonald did this in 2002 with Be Nice). And so I immediately moved this book up on my TBR list to right now. (I mean, Roxane Gay even got in on the conversation and wrote this hilarious McSweeney’s post about “All Male Movie Remakes.”)

 Libba Bray herself wrote about her struggles with having the book turned in to a movie after it was optioned:

“But even when you do get up to bat, it’s still hard to have those female characters become real people. I saw a script in which every stereotype I tried to subvert in BQ was made real. There was an actual hair-pulling catfight. It’s hard to put into words exactly how I felt at that moment. But try, if you will, to imagine me with lasers coming out of my eyes while my internal organs became as the fires of Mordor. They didn’t get it. And they were legit trying to get it, which made it doubly painful. It wasn’t laziness; it was a fundamental tone deafness. An inability to comprehend and relate to women as real people.”

This article is a must-read, just as the book is. I love a good satire, and I also love a good satire that is a slapstick romp at times. The characters are diverse in many ways, and I identified with more than one of them.  I have now put all Libba Bray’s books on my TBR list.

I read Beauty Queens in two sittings (it would have been one, but I started reading it the weekend after school started at 7:30pm, and you know how that goes, I was asleep with a book on my face by 8:30pm). I laughed out loud, read my husband certain lines, shook my head grimly at times, and at other points wrote down favorite lines.

If I were still teaching The Lord of the Flies I would definitely be doing something to pair Beauty Queens with it, and talk about how books are always social commentary of the time in which they were written. Unfortunately, many of the issues in Beauty Queens are still issues. Also unfortunately for people who also might want to teach with this, there’s lots of language that might be considered inappropriate for schools.

So if you need the kind of book you can sink in to and read non-stop, or if you need a break from all the lesson planning and grading (welcome back to the school year), or if you just want a funny book you can laugh out loud to and then immediately want to force all your friends to read, check out Beauty Queens.

Posted by Kate, PCTELA blog editor

Book Review: Reading Libba Bray’s Beauty Queens