Selznick’s Secret Doorways by Jason Griffith

Read PCTELA member Jason Griffith’s review of Brian Selznick’s lecture called “Showing to Tell,” part of Julie Burstein’s “Spark” series of cultural conversations at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Nerdy Book Club

The neat thing about seeing Van Gogh’s paintings live and in-person is that you can clearly see the brush strokes in the texture of the paint. It only takes a little imagination to picture Van Gogh madly dashing and dabbing his way across the canvas.

marvelsIn June, I visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art for the first time, and one of their featured exhibitions was Van Gogh’s Irises and Roses. It was the first time the four paintings in the set had been reunited since Van Gogh painted them 125 years ago. An exciting event for sure, but I had come for a different reason. Brian Selznick was taking part in a lecture called “Showing to Tell,” part of Julie Burstein’s “Spark” series of cultural conversations at the museum.

The neat thing about examining a Brian Selznick illustration is that you can clearly see the ghosts of pencil…

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Selznick’s Secret Doorways by Jason Griffith

Friday Five: Reading Over the Summer

Guest post by Gina Motter:

This summer (with two courses, planning for block schedules, and a condensing of 39 family photo albums into something to manage digitally), I find I will not be able to read 28 or so books as I did last summer. For the reasons listed, I am determined to finish these and am currently on #3:

  1. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. A classic coming-of-age title I should have read by now. My son, a resident of Queens, takes me to Brooklyn often when I visit. I been to the other boroughs many times, too, but Brooklyn is my favorite.
  2. The Boys in the Boat. Fabulous NF which celebrates the 1936 U.S. men’s Olympic eight-oar rowing team’s quest for gold. Always some summer NF, often a sport for me! Recommended by a German teacher friend who admits to reading very little on his own.imgres
  3. The Kingmaker’s Daughter by Philippa Gregory. I love all that English “stuff” by her, by Hilary Mantel, and others.
  4. God, Dr. Buzzard, and the Bolito Man: A Saltwater Geechee Talks About Life on Sapelo Island by Cornelia Bailey with Christina Bledsoe. With retirement to Georgia one possibility for us, I wanted an “unusual” read and found this. Recommended by a tech support friend who rereads it periodically as it is a favorite.
  5. Teaching in the Block. That’s what’s coming up September 1st for our school. I have only one year’s experience (elsewhere) with this and look forward to this challenge.

Today’s post is by Gina Motter, a teacher at State College Area High School.

Friday Five: Reading Over the Summer

Halfway Through Our First-Ever Summer Academy: Notes From The Front

Check out Jennie’s summer experience at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Folger SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY

Summer Academy participant Jennie Brown shares her experience at the mid-way point of Summer Academy 2015 which took place from July 5-10, 2015. 

By Jennie Brown

Jennie Brown arrives at Summer Academy 2015 (Image: Jennie Brown) Jennie Brown arriving at Summer Academy 2015 (Image: Jennie Brown)

Where do I even begin to describe my experience so far (only on day 3!) of the Teaching Shakespeare Institute’s Summer Academy 2015 at the Folger Shakespeare Library in DC?!  Mind-blowing, awesome, humbling, exciting, the list goes on and on.

From workshops with theater professionals and esteemed educators to sword-fighting (yes, I said sword-fighting) on the lawn, to classes with Folger scholars and master teachers to interacting with the Folger collection of rare books, this is one week that will never be forgotten. Below, I’ve put together some of the highlights of this journey so far. [If you know me, you know you’ll find pictures below as well!]

  1. Amazing Teachers: There are 28 amazing…

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Halfway Through Our First-Ever Summer Academy: Notes From The Front